We Have Reached The Other Side Of The Racism Coin

“I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.”
– Martin Luther King, Jr., August 28, 1963

A few months before I was born, Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps on the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC. I grew up in a very integrated neighborhood in Southern California, so racism was not something I observed as much as someone in other parts of the country would have lived with. That is not to say it did not exist, but it was subtle, and I honestly can never  remember anyone outwardly voicing the kind of hate that is associated with the racism of my youth.

I do not remember at what age I first heard King’s famous speech. What I do remember, however, is what my initial reaction to is was. It was not some new radical idea that I had never considered. To me, his words were simply common sense. If anything, I felt a sense of sadness that we were not already at a point in our history where his dream was a reality.

I did have hope that we would get there in my lifetime.

So imagine my dismay at reading this on my newsfeed this morning:

Race agitators in Milwaukee used the police shooting of an unarmed armed black man to burn down their city and attack white people. Several videos show white drivers being stopped in the middle of the street and the “protesters” attempting to pull them out of their vehicles.

“They’re beating every white person!” one of the agitators shouted in the video. “They jumpin’ every white person.” When the mob spotted a white driver, they attempted to block his car from passing.

“He white! Beat his sh*t!” the man yelled.

In the 1960s, White racists harassed, beat and murdered African-Americans, and the pop culture, and the political class, and the media not only looked the other way, or excused their actions, but often openly supported the actions of the racists. It was a time of national insanity (or the continuation of a national insanity that existed since the first slave was brought to America in the 17th century).

Today, BLM agitators openly harass, beat and murder White Americans, and the pop culture, the political class, and the media provide cover for them, excuse their behavior, and often openly support their actions.

Congratulations my fellow Americans. We have reached the other side of the racism coin. We are just as far from the society that King spoke about now as we were in the 1960s. It is our national shame, and it is because we suffer from a national cowardice, where we submit to the pressures of political correctness and the desire to keep from offending anyone. It is pathetic.

Speaking out against racism is the right action. Every. Single. Time. Whether that racism comes from Whites, or Blacks, or Muslims, or from any other group is immaterial. Racism, bigotry and hate cannot be cured by more racism, bigotry and hate. Anyone who believes otherwise, and acts on that belief should be called out to answer for their own stupidity.

To quote the great Edmund Burke, “The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.” It is long past time that good men step up and push back against the racist terrorism that BLM practices. Regardless of how noble many who support BLM are in their intentions (and there instances where better relationships between police and the community they serve are possible), racism and violence have no place in our society.

The actions of those in Milwaukee only serve to further fray the fabric of our society. Enough is enough.

 

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